Addington Family DNA project

 sponsored by the Addington Association and coordinated by Dr. David V. Addington

There are four major Addington families in the USA and to date genealogical researchers have not been able to connect them with any vital records.  The purpose of this study is to use advances in genetic technology to see if these families are closely related.  Eight DNA samples were gathered from male descendants of 5 Addington families and compared.  These are the results of this study. 
I hope you find it interesting.

Results reported as February 15, 2008

 

Kit Num Name Haplo 393 390 19 391 385a 385b 426 388 439 389-1 392 389-2 458 459a 459b 455 454 447 437 448 449 464a 464b 464c 464d
Descendants of Henry Addington of PA and SC
81210 DV Addington E3b1 13 24 13 10 15 18 11 12 12 14 11 31 15 9 9 11 11 28 14 20 34 14 16 17 17
81218 CP Addington E3b1 13 24 13 10 15 18 11 12 12 14 11 31 15 9 9 11 11 28 14 20 34 14 16 17 17
81230 A Addington E3b1 13 24 13 10 15 18 11 12 12 14 11 31 15 9 9 11 11 28 14 20 34 14 16 17 17
Descendant of John Addington of CT
81271 B Addington E3b1 13 24 13 10 15 18 11 12 12 14 11 31 16 9 9 11 11 28 14 20 34 14 16 17 17
Descendants of William Addington of VA
81369 N Addington E3b1 14 24 14 9 13 15 11 12 12 14 11 31 16 9 9 11 11 20 14 20 29 15 15 16 17
  D Addington E3b1 14 24 14 9 13 15 11 12 12 14 11 31 16 9 9 11 11 20 14 20 29 15 15 16 17

Descendant of Henry Addington of MD and KY
81242 P Addington R1b1 13 24 14 10 12 14 12 12 11 14 13 30 17 9 10 11 11 25 15 19 31 15 15 17 17

Descendant of Sabird Addington, b. 1804 NC
109956 H Addington R1b1 13 24 14 11 11 16 12 12 13 13 13 29 16 9 10 11 11 25 15 20 28 15 15 17 17

 

 

D V Addington is a 7th generation descendant of Henry Addington of South Carolina thru son John

A Addington is a 7th generation descendant of Henry Addington of South Carolina thru son James

C P Addington is a 7th generation descendant of Henry Addington of South Carolina thru son William

 

They match 25 for 25 in the Y DNA25 test.  At a common ancestor 7 generations back,  this is the expected match.

Using the standard mutation rate, the number of generations to a Most Common Ancestor is

Method 50% 90% 95% 95% Confidence Interval
Infinite Alleles 7 23 30 0-37
Stepwise correction 7 24 32 0-39

Using the high mutation rate, the number of generations to a Most Common Ancestor is

Method 50% 90% 95% 95% Confidence Interval
Infinite Alleles 4 12 15 0-19
Stepwise correction 4 12 16 0-20

(from http://nitro.biosci.arizona.edu/ftDNA/TMRCA.html)

Interpretation:   A 25 out of 25 match should be expected for a common ancestor 7 generations back and all individuals descend from Henry Addington of South Carolina

 

 

 

B Addington is a 7th generation descendant of John Addington of Connecticut born about 1719

This Y DNA matches 24 of 25 sites in the Y DNA25 test with a one step mis-match at site 13 to the above results

 

Using standard mutation rate, the number of generations to a Most Common Ancestor is

Method 50% 90% 95% 95% Confidence Interval
Infinite Alleles 17 40 48 2-57
Stepwise correction 18 41 52 3-61

Using the high mutation rate, the number of generations to a Most Common Ancestor is

Method 50% 90% 95% 95% Confidence Interval
Infinite Alleles 9 20 24 1-28
Stepwise correction 9 21 26 1-31

 

 

Interpretation:   Henry Addington of SC and John Addington of CT are probably related another 3 to 7 generations back

 

 

 

 

N Addington is a 6th generation descendant of William Addington (1750-1807) of Virginia thru his son Charles Cromwell and his grandson William

D Addington is a 7th generation descendant of William Addington (1750-1807) of Virginia

Their DNA matches exactly at the first 25 markers as would be expected for a common ancestor 6 or 7 generations back.

 

 

Their Y-DNA matches 7 of the first 12 sites, and 14 of the 25 sites with the first group of samples above.  The Haplogroups are both E3b.

 

Interpretation:   Henry Addington of PA and SC and William Addington of VA are not closely related even though they carry the same family surname

 

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P Addington is a 5th generation descendant of Henry Addington (1774, MD -1850, KY) of Ohio Co., KY thru his son William Blackman Addington.

 

This Y-DNA matches only 5 of the first 12 sites for the first set of data (Henry of PA and SC), and 10 of the first 25 sites.   This Y-DNA matches only 4 of the first 12 sites for the second set of data (William of VA) and 10 of the first 25 sites.  The Haplogroup is initially listed as R1b1 and different than the above samples.

 

 

Interpretation:   Henry Addington of MD/KY is not closely related to either Henry Addington of PA/SC or William Addington of VA.



H Addington is a 5th generation descendant of Sabird Addington (b. 1804, NC) who first shows up in TN in 1833.  It has been thought by several researchers that Sabird Addington was probably related to Henry Addington of SC because of the date and location of his birth.

 

This Y-DNA matches only 3 of the first 12 sites for the first set of data (Henry of PA and SC), and the Haplogroup is initially listed as R1b1.  This Y profile does not match any of the other Addington families either.

 



Interpretation:   The Addington family starting with Sabird Addington, b. 1804, NC,  is not related to any of the Addington families above.



SUMMARY

 

The Addington family of Henry Addington of PA/SC is closely related to the Addington family of John Addington of CT.

 


The other 3 Addington families (William Addington of VA, Henry Addington of MD/KY and Sabird Addington, b. 1804 NC) are not related to each other or the Addington family above.


 

Even though each family carries the Addington surname, they must have picked up the name in different locations or under different circumstances.

 

 

 

Before this study, there were some family stories about lost brothers, etc but no firm evidence of how these 4 Addington families  (Henry of PA and SC, John of CT, William of VA and Henry of MD/Ohio Co., KY) were related.  This y-DNA study shows that Henry of PA and John of CT are closely related, somewhere back in England.  These 3 other Addington families are not closely related to this Addington family.  This is new and significant information to the genealogy enthusiast.

 

 

Where do we go from here?  The biggest question remaining for each of the above groups is from where in England did they come.  If we could identify Addington males in England who can trace their Addington ancestry to specific ancestors or locations, then y-DNA matches with them would give us an ancestor or English location from which to do further searching and research. 

 

 

The e3b Haplogroup is not the most common haplogroup in Great Britain and is seen at a concentration of 1 to 6% in the central shires.  It is thought to have been brought to Great Britain by the Romans times or perhaps earlier than that.  It probably came up from the Iberian Peninsula.

 

 

In two recently published books, Blood of the Isles, by Bryan Sykes and The Origins of the British, by Stephen Oppenheimer, both authors state that according to genetic studies (mainly Haplogroup R1b as well as E3b, I, J (Y-DNA) and Mtdna), most Britons descend mainly from ancient populations of the Iberian Peninsula, as a result of different migrations that took place during the Mesolithic and the Neolithic, which laid the foundations for the present-day populations in the British Isles, indicating an ancient relationship among the populations of Atlantic Europe. Both Authors claim that there is evidence for this on both the y-chromosomes and maternal dna. Stephen Oppenheimer is even able to date when migrations to the British Isles took place and where exactly within the Iberian peninsula these different migrations originated. Stephen Oppenheimer also claims that there were neolithic invasions to Scotland from Norway prior to Norwegien Viking invasions and that the Vikings would take the same invasion routes as their previous neolithic invaders.[10][11][12]

In Origins of the British (2006), Stephen Oppenheimer states (pages 375 and 378):

By far the majority of male gene types in the British Isles derive from Iberia (Spain and Portugal), ranging from a low of 59% in Fakenham, Norfolk to highs of 96% in Llangefni, north Wales and 93% Castlerea, Ireland. On average only 30% of gene types in England derive from north-west Europe. Even without dating the earlier waves of north-west European immigration, this invalidates the Anglo-Saxon wipeout theory…
…75-95% of British Isles (genetic) matches derive from Iberia...Ireland, coastal Wales, and central and west-coast Scotland are almost entirely made up from Iberian founders, while the rest of the non-English parts of the British Isles have similarly high rates. England has rather lower rates of Iberian types with marked heterogeneity, but no English sample has less than 58% of Iberian samples…
In page 367 he also states in relation to Rossers's pan-European genetic distance map:

 

 

 

 

Research studies of interest

 

Y Haplogroup  E3b

 

UK Haplogroup distribution

 

 

2012 DNA Study Update

 

ADDINGTON DNA STUDY UPDATE

In the initial DNA study finished in 2008, the results showed that the Addington family of Henry Addington of PA/SC was closely related to the Addington family of John Addington of CT.  These two families were found to not be closely related to the William Addington family of VA nor the Maryland Addingtons.

Two additional DNA samples have been added to the study to further clarify the relationship between the first two families mentioned above.  Since 2008, advances in the DNA testing have used 63 marker comparisons rather than the 25 marker comparisons used earlier.

DNA additional samples from two descendants of John Addington of CT were obtained and analyzed and compared to the samples from descendants of Henry Addington of PA/SC.

D. V. Addington is a 7th generation direct male descendant of Henry Addington (1720-1787) of PA/SC through his son John Addington (1754-1833) who participated in the original study and had his DNA sample extended to 63 markers.    J. R. Addington is a 7th generation direct male descendant of John Addington (ca1719- ?) of CT through his son Henry (1752-1834).   E. P. Addington is a 7th generation direct male descendant of John Addington (ca1719- ?)  of CT through his son William Addington (1756 - ??) who moved to Nova Scotia after the Revolutionary War and a line of descendants who later moved back into Maine.

The Results

 D. V. Addington and E. P. Addington match exactly the key first 25 markers and then match 35 of the next 38 markers (being off only 1 marker at DYS570, DYA413, DYA520).  Using the standard statistical and probability assumptions for this level of agreement, the prediction would be that there is a 40% chance that they share the same 8th generation ancestor (or that Henry Addington of PA/SC and John Addington of CT were brothers).

 D. V. Addington and J. R. Addington match exactly all 63 markers in this DNA analysis.  This was a surprising result but the accuracy of the laboratory analysis can hardly be questioned.  Using the standard statistical and probability assumptions for this level of agreement, the prediction would be that there is a 68% chance that they share the same 8th generation ancestor (or that Henry Addington of PA/SC and John Addington of CT were brothers, same father).  If Henry and John were not brothers, then there is a 14% further  probability that Henry Addington of PA/SC and John Addington of CT were cousins (i.e. same Addington grandfather).  If Henry and John were not cousins, then there is a 8% further probability that Henry Addington of PA/SC and John Addington of CT were 2nd cousins (i.e. same Addington great grandfather).

 So the final conclusion from this additional DNA sampling is that Henry Addington (b. 1720) of PA/SC and John Addington (b. ca 1719) of CT are most probably brothers which is consistent with their birth years or estimated birth years.  In my researching of Henry Addington I have shown data that suggests that the John Addington  who shows up in Bucks County, PA records from 1693 to 1722 is Henry's father which would now mean that he is also the father of John Addington of CT.

 The next step in this DNA study is to find a male Addington in England who can trace his ancestry back multiple generations to a English Addington family or a specific location and time.  Perhaps we can tie our American Addington family to a specific English Addington family.  The study goes on......

 

 

2013 DNA Study Update

 

  Table of the Addington DNA Study Results as of February 2013

 

 

 

A descendant of the UK Bedfordshire Addingtons, A C Addington, has provided a DNA sample and the results are in.  The ancestry of the Bedfordshire Addingtons have been reported at the following website:  http://addington.tribalpages.com/

 

A C Addington is a 10th generation descendant of the Silvester Addington, b. 1589, Melchbourne, Bedfordshire, who is the first known ancestor of the UK Bedfordshire Addingtons.

 

A C Addington and N Addington have one mis-match (DYS464) in 67 y-dna markers and three sites (DYS425, DYS534, DYS481) where one is missing data.

 

The following are the probability statistics generated when comparing their samples.  If the three locations where there is missing data (which the program considers mis-matches) are taken out, the probabilities of a common ancestor would be even higher.

 

Compare Y-DNA67 markers.
Compare A C Addington  to N Addington
They do not share a common ancestor more recently than 6 generations ago.

In comparing Y-DNA67 markers, which show 4 mismatches, the probability that (81369) N Addington and (265081) A C Addington shared a common ancestor within the last...

...8 generations is 36.40%.
...12 generations is 75.08%.
...16 generations is 92.43%.
...20 generations is 98.06%.
...24 generations is 99.56%.

* Assuming (81369)  and (265081)  do not share a common ancestor in the last 6 generations..

** The FTDNATiP™ results are based on the mutation rate study presented during the 1st International Conference on Genetic Genealogy, on Oct. 30, 2004. The above probabilities take into consideration the mutation rates for each individual marker being compared. Since each marker has a different mutation rate, identical Genetic Distances will not necessarily yield the same probabilities. In other words, even though XXXX has a Genetic Distance of XXXX from XXXX, someone else with the same Genetic Distance may have different probabilities, because the distance of 1 was prompted by mutations in different markers, with different mutation rates.

 

Let's consider the known ancestry of N Addington and A C Addington

For N Addington,

6th generation ancestry -  William Addington, b. 1750, reportedly London
7th generation ancestry -  Unknown Addington, b. approx. 1720, assuming England
8th generation ancestry -  Unknown Addington, b. approx. 1690, assuming England
9th generation ancestry - Unknown Addington, b. approx. 1660, assuming England
10th generation ancestry - Unknown Addington, b. approx. 1630, assuming England

 For A C Addington,

6th generation ancestry -  Peter Addington, b. 1726, Tempsford, b. 1784
7th generation ancestry -  William Addington, b. 1685 Eaton Socon, d. 1762
8th generation ancestry -  Silvester Addington, b. 1650, d. 1686
9th generation ancestry - Luke Addington, b. 1610, d. 1651
10th generation ancestry - Silvester Addington, b. 1589, Melchbourne, Bedfordshire, d. 1651

Given the closeness of the dna matches and the above probabilities, these two ancestral lines of William Addington of VA and the Bedfordshire Addingtons must cross sometime within this period.  More information for future genealogical research......

 

Also in 2013, a descendant of the William Addington of Nova Scotia, C Addington, has provided a DNA sample and the results are in.   William Addington of Nova Scotia has long been reported as a son of the John Addington of CT who was a loyalist during the Revolutionary War and moved to Nova Scotia after the war ended.  The Addington families around Digby, Nova Scotia are all descended from this William.

 

C Addington is a 5th or 6th generation descendant of the William Addington of Nova Scotia.

 

The 67 markers for C Addington are shown in the above table.  C Addington matches 65 out of 67 markers with J. Addington who is a 7th generation descendant of John Addington of CT thru his son Henry.  C Addington matches 64 out of 67 markers with E P Addington who is a 7th generation descendant of John Addington of CT thru his son William who moved to Nova Scotia and some of his Addington descendants who later moved back into Maine in the 1850s.

 

The results from C Addington confirm that the Nova Scotia Addingtons are descended from the John Addington of CT.

Thanks to these individuals for participating in this study and adding to our knowledge of the Addington families.

 

 

 

 

 

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