Addington Family DNA project  -  2020

 sponsored by the Addington Association

 

There is some new Y-dna data that has become available in the last year that adds to our understanding of the various Addington families, both in America and England.

 

C. J. Addington of the UK (a 6th generation direct line male descendant of Thomas Addington, b. c1750, d. 1819, Grafton Regis, Northamptonshire, m. Martha Craft) has provided a dna sample and it has been analyzed by Family Tree DNA.

 

Two other male descendants of our family (descendants of Henry Addington(1714/20-1787) ), R. J. Addington and P. M. Addington have also had their y-dna samples analyzed.  They are both 7th generation descendants of our Henry Addington.

 

When I asked for the genetic distance from C. J. Addington to others in our family, I got the following:

 

67 markers
 
 
Genetic Distance    Full Name


1                             R. J. Addington (descendant of William Addington, son of Henry Addington(1714/20-1787)

2                             D. V. Addington (descendant of John Addington, son of Henry Addington(1714/20-1787)

3                             P. M. Addington (descendant of William Addington, son of Henry Addington(1714/20-1787)

 

This shows that the Addington family of Chris Addington and the American Addington family of Henry Addington(1714/20-1787) have had a common male ancestor in the not too distant past.  From the genetic distance, familytreedna provides a probability chart that estimates when there might have been a common male ancestor.

 

In comparing Y-DNA 67 marker results, the probability that D. V. Addington and Chris Addington shared a common ancestor within the last...
Generations Percentage
6     35.71%
7     59.27%
8     74.49%
9     84.18%
10     90.26%
11     94.05%
12     96.38%
13     97.81%
14     98.68%
15     99.21%

This means that Thomas Addington, (b. c1750, d. 1819, Grafton Regis, Northamptonshire, m. Martha Craft) and John Addington(b. before 1672, assumed England, shows up in Bucks Co., PA records in 1692 and assumed to be Henry Addington(1714/20-1787)'s father) shared a common male ancestor probably some time in the 1500-1600 time frame (9 to 12 generations back).  At this time we can not take either family back far enough to establish the exact common ancestor.

 

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In late November on familtreedna.com, I found a Y-dna match of 3 genetic units distance at 67 markers between the  Y-dna of D. V. Addington and another Addington with a UK email address.   Because of my  promise of confidentiality, I will not identify the individual but just refer to him as UK Addington and state that he is a 6th generation direct line male descendant of Prime Minister Henry Addington. 
 
The match was close enough to confirm that the family of Henry Addington (1714/20-1787) and the family of the Prime Minister Henry Addington (1757-1844) had a common male ancestor in the not too distance past.
 
In comparing Y-DNA 67 marker results, the probability that UK Addington and D. V. Addington had a common male ancestor are as follows:  (We know that they have not shared a common ancestor within the last 8 generations.)
Generations       Percentage

9       61.02%
10     75.97%
11     85.28%
12     91.04%
13     94.57%
14     96.72%
15     98.03%
16     98.82%
17     99.3%
18     99.58%

 

 

 

The family of Prime Minister Henry Addington was well documented in the 1959 book Annals of the Addington family.  I have used information from this book and other data from ancestry.com to try to see where the families may connect.
 
Our family immigrant is the John Addington who first shows up in Bucks Co., PA records in 1693.  If he was at least 21 years old to be in these records, that means his birth year would need to be 1672 or earlier.  That is the criteria that I have been using and the records show that there are several John Addingtons in English records who might fit the criteria.
 
Now let’s look at which John Addingtons born 1672 or earlier are from the Prime Minister Henry Addington line.
 
 
The most probable connection may be a John Addington, bapt. 19 Nov 1671 Stepney Saint Dunstan London, parents Laurence and Mary Addington
 
In Annals of the Addington family, there is a Ralph Addington, mentioned in parents will, buried at Finmere, Oxfordshire in 1592.  The book says from this Ralph Addington, the Finmere and Chetwode Addingtons descend.
 
From English records, these are the only Addington records from Chetwode:
 
Thomas           Addington       M        Birth    abt 1587          Chetwode        Buckingham
Thomas           Addington       M        Marriage 16 Feb 1612  Chetwode      Buckingham
Laurence         Addington       M        Christening 29 Mar 1613 Chetwode  Buckingham
Anne   Addington       F          Christening     Jan 1615         Chetwode        Buckingham
Anne   Addington       F          Christening     14 Sep 1637   Chetwode        Buckingham
Mary   Addington       F          Christening     14 Sep 1637   Chetwode        Buckingham
Laurence Addington   M        Christening     24 Apr 1648    Chetwode        Buckingham
 
Laurence, spelled this way, is not a very common name in the Addington family and this data suggest that Thomas could be a son or grandson of Ralph, he had a son Laurence, bapt 1613 and a grandson Laurence bapt 1648.  This Laurence would have been 23 years old when the John Addington, was bapt. in 1671 at Stepney, Saint Dunstan, London.
 
 
Here is the discussion of this John Addington from the recent ProGenealogist’s report:
 
John Addington, baptized 1668 in St Dunstan, Stepney, London and John Addington, baptized 1671 in St Dunstan, Stepney
 
John Addington, baptized 1668, was the son of John Addington, a porter of Limehouse and his wife Mary. John Addington, baptized 1671, was the son of Laurence Addington, a porter of Limehouse and his wife Mary. The similarity in details immediately raised the question of whether a mistake was made at the 1668 baptism and the father should really have been recorded as Laurence. One of the
most common mistakes found in parish registers is for the clergyman or parish clerk to have written the child’s or one of the parents’ names out twice by mistake. If this were to prove the case here, the fact that the two baptisms occurred within a few years of each other, would suggest that the first John died as an infant.
We found that in 1670, John, son of Laurence Addington of Limehouse was buried, which added weight to our theory. We found no other baptism to a John and Mary Addington in the Stepney area but found that Laurence and Mary had other children Elizabeth (1669) and Laurence (1675), both also baptized in St Dunstan.
 
We felt we had enough evidence to conclude that the father’s name had been mistakenly recorded as John instead of Laurence in 1668 and that this child died in 1670, meaning he was excluded as being your ancestor. This left John, baptized in 1671, remaining as a candidate.
 
We could find no evidence that this John died or married in London. We found that John’s younger brother, Laurence, a shipwright, married in Stepney in 1703, so he remained in the area. We considered Laurence Addington Sr. further and found that he was likely baptized in Chetwode, Buckinghamshire in 1648 and he appears to have been transported from Newgate Prison to Barbados in 1683.
 
We cannot rule out the 1671 John with any certainty, and living where he did, he would certainly have had the opportunity to join a voyage to the New world and so he remains a good candidate to be the father of your ancestor Henry.
 
 
 
That fact that Laurence Addington, Sr. was transported to Barbados in the New World in 1683 suggests that his son John might have also migrated to the New World.
 
 
If John Addington, bapt. 1671, Stepney (AP-4-2-1-1?-1?-1?-1? Chetwode line) is the John Addington of the 1693 Bucks Co., PA record, then:
 
 
Our Common Ancestor:  AP-4-2 Robert Addington, of Potterspury, will proved 1555     12 generations back            6 generations before Prime Minister Henry Addington

 

Generations       Percentage

8       37.27%   
9       61.02%   
10     75.97%   
11     85.28%    AP-4-2-1 Ralph Addington, mentioned in parents will, buried at Finmere, Oxfordshire in 1592
12     91.04%    AP-4-2 Robert Addington, of Potterspury, will proved 1555  (common to Prime Minister Henry Addington)
13     94.57%   
14     96.72%   
15     98.03%


When Laurence Addington was shipped to Barbados in 1683, his son John would have been 12 years old.  John probably stayed in London but maybe he too was shipped to Barbados.  One proposed scenario is that this John Addington eventually became an indentured servant and was sent to serve out  his indenture to Philadelphia.  He would have served out his indenture of maybe 5 years (normal length of indenture according to research).  Then he would have gained his freedom and stayed in the area until he shows up in the 1693 legal record in Bucks County. 

 

My personal opinion that this is a very plausible scenario and has a probability of about 80-90% of being correct.   Our John Addington could have come from some other lines in England that connect to the Prime Minister Henry Addington line but we have insufficient information to make any other reasonable connection at this time.

 

It would appear that our Addington family ultimately goes back to the Potterspury area in Northamptonshire, England in the 1500s.

 

In summary, the new Y-dna show that the families of

(1) Prime Minister Henry Addington (1757-1824)

(2) English Addington family descended from Thomas Addington (b ca1750, d. 1819, Grafton Regis, Northamptonshire)

(3) American Addington family descended from Henry Addington (1714/20-1787)

all shared a common male ancestor in the not too distance past (roughly 12-15 generations back)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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